Category Archive: Scolopacidae

Aug 16 2014

The Slender-billed Curlew, last seen in the previous century

In 1875 Bree wrote: “In all parts of Italy this species is met with; but while it is only a bird of passage and rather rare in the northern parts, in the central and southern parts it is common, and passes the winter there. In Sicily and in Malta it is the most common species …

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Aug 11 2014

Spoon-billed Sandpiper (Calidris pygmaea)

It is incredible what activity this little bird has rendered since, about 8 years ago, for still not fully understood reasons, its popluation had declined to less than a 1000 individuals. In present day it is estimated at only 250 individuals and the population is aging. The crucial countries all working together, the action plans, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.planetofbirds.com/spoon-billed-sandpiper-calidris-pygmaea

Nov 12 2013

How the Curlew Down-under got his thin red legs

Bleargah the hawk, mother of Ouyan the curlew, said one day to her son: “Go, Ouyan, out, take your spears and kill an emu. The women and I are hungry. You are a man, go out and kill, that we may eat. You must not stay always in the camp like an old woman; you …

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May 19 2013

Folklore, how the Snipe got its long beak

At one time there were no lakes. There were creeks and rivers, but no lakes. Raven wanted to make lakes, so he made a depression in the ground for to collect the water and a new lake began to form. Then he put fish in the new lake. After a time he returned to see …

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May 09 2013

Bird stories, Curlew (Numenius arquata)

The sad wailing, cry of these birds, while on the wing, in the dark still nights of winter, resembling the moans of wandering spirits, is believed in some parts of England to be a death warning, and called the cry of the Seven Whistlers. In Scotland the farmers think the cry is exactly like the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.planetofbirds.com/bird-stories-curlew-numenius-arquata

May 03 2013

Identification Buff-breasted Sandpiper vs Ruff

Plate from RSPB site.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.planetofbirds.com/identification-buff-breasted-sandpiper-vs-ruff

May 03 2013

Identification Bar-tailed Godwit vs Black-tailed Godwit

Plate from RSPB site.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.planetofbirds.com/identification-bar-tailed-godwit-vs-black-tailed-godwit

Dec 31 2011

Subspecific Identification of the Willet Catoptrophorus semipalmatus

Willet (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) Science Article 3 abstract The Willet is a familiar shorebird to many birders around temperate regions of North, Central, and South America. Its large size, drab plumage, and flashy wing pattern make it relatively straightforward to identify Michael O’Brien, BIRDING MAY/JUNE 2 0 0 6 Download article download full text (pdf)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.planetofbirds.com/willet-article-3

Dec 31 2011

Predator avoidance behaviour of a solitary Willet attacked by a Peregrine Falcon

Willet (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) Science Article 2 abstract During the non-breeding season, Willets Catoptrophorus semipalmatus use a variety of tactics to avoid predators and have been reported to take flight, submerge themselves inwater, and hide in or near marsh vegetation JOSEPH B. BUCHANAN, Bulletin 104 August 2004 Download article download full text (pdf)

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Dec 31 2011

Social Organization In A Nesting Population Of Eastern Willets (Catoptrophorus Semipalmatus)

Willet (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) Science Article 1 abstract The breeding ecology of eastern Willets (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) was studied over a 3-yr period in a salt marsh on the Atlantic coast of Virginia. During the study,171 adults were color-marked MARSHALL A. HOWE, The Auk 99: 88-102. January 1982 Download article download full text (pdf)

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