Mantled Hawk (Leucopternis polionotus)

Mantled Hawk

[order] ACCIPITRIFORMES | [family] Accipitridae | [latin] Leucopternis polionotus | [authority] Kaup, 1847 | [UK] Mantled Hawk | [FR] Buse mantelee | [DE] Mantelbussard | [ES] Busardo Blanquinegro | [NL] Kaups Bonte Buizerd

Subspecies

Monotypic species

Genus

Members of the genus Leucopternis are small to medium-sized buteonine hawks with short and rounded wings and a moderate length tail. In some species the sides of the head are partly bare of feathers and brightly coloured, as are the legs. P1umage pattern is quite simple; immatures are similar to adults. This large genus is placed between Buteo and Buteogallus, and contains ten species, all tropical American.

Physical charateristics

The Mantled Hawk is a rather large black and white hawk of Atlantic forests of eastern South America. It typically is found in hilly or mountainous areas, ranging from Alagoas and Bahia states in northeastern Brazil south to eastern Paraguay and Uruguay. It forms a superspecies with the widespread White Hawk (Leucopternis albicollis) and with the Gray-backed Hawk (Leucopternis occidentalis) of the Tumbesian region. The only similar sympatric species is the White-necked Hawk (Leucopternis lacernulatus), which is smaller and has a terminal black tail band and pale irides. The Mantled Hawk feeds on reptiles and amphibians, birds, and small mammals. The nest and breeding behavior of this species are undescribed. Agricultural conversion and deforestation for mining and plantation production historically threatened its habitats. Current key threats are urbanisation, industrialisation, agricultural expansion, colonisation and associated road-building. In Brazil, observations suggest that the species has adapted to landscapes composed of pine plantations and native forest. In flight it has broad, rounded wings and a short tail.

Listen to the sound of Mantled Hawk

[audio:http://www.planetofbirds.com/MASTER/ACCIPITRIFORMES/Accipitridae/sounds/Mantled Hawk.mp3]

Copyright remark: Most sounds derived from xeno-canto


wingspan min.: 0 cm wingspan max.: 0 cm
size min.: 47 cm size max.: 51 cm
incubation min.: 0 days incubation max.: 0 days
fledging min.: 0 days fledging max.: 0 days
broods: 0   eggs min.: 0  
      eggs max.: 0  

Range

South America : East Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay. Leucopternis polionotus is rare to locally fairly common in east Brazil (Alagoas to Rio Grande do Sul)9, and rare in east Uruguay and south-east Paraguay

Habitat

It occurs in lowland and mid-elevation humid forests, especially in foothills. It has also been recorded in secondary growth and, in Parana, plantations. It is found at sea-level to at least 1,500 m (probably mainly above 500 m). It typically is found in hilly or mountainous areas, ranging from Alagoas and Bahia states in northeastern Brazil south to eastern Paraguay and Uruguay.

Reproduction

The nest and breeding behavior of this species are undescribed.

Feeding habits

It feeds on reptiles, small mammals and birds such as thrushes, tanagers and even larger trogons and Squirrel Cuckoo.

Video Mantled Hawk

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRGfLlo9BeI

copyright: J. del Hoyo


Conservation

This species has a moderately small population which is thought to be declining significantly owing to habitat loss and fragmentation. It is consequently classified as Near Threatened, but further information on its population size and trends may result in its uplisting.
The Mantled Hawk is a rather large black and white hawk of Atlantic forests of eastern South America. It typically is found in hilly or mountainous areas, ranging from Alagoas and Bahia states in northeastern Brazil south to eastern Paraguay and Uruguay. It forms a superspecies with the widespread White Hawk (Leucopternis albicollis) and with the Gray-backed Hawk (Leucopternis occidentalis) of the Tumbesian region. The only similar sympatric species is the White-necked Hawk (Leucopternis lacernulatus), which is smaller and has a terminal black tail band and pale irides. The Mantled Hawk feeds on reptiles and amphibians, birds, and small mammals. The nest and breeding behavior of this species are undescribed. Agricultural conversion and deforestation for mining and plantation production historically threatened its habitats. Current key threats are urbanisation, industrialisation, agricultural expansion, colonisation and associated road-building. In Brazil, observations suggest that the species has adapted to landscapes composed of pine plantations and native forest.
Mantled Hawk status Near Threatened

Migration

Sedentary

Distribution map

Mantled Hawk distribution range map

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